Conducting paid-for initial pilot training in amateur-built UK National Permit to Fly Microlights

Closed 17 Feb 2020

Opened 6 Jan 2020

Feedback updated 6 Oct 2020

We asked

The purpose of this consultation was for you to give the CAA views on our proposal of extending paid-for initial (Ab initio) pilot training to be conducted using amateur-built microlights which hold a UK national Permit-to-Fly (PtF).

We presented a comprehensive, yet proportionate set of requirements to mitigate risks and where possible align safety standards for airworthiness to a comparable level of safety with those already in the flight training environment.

The consultation was drafted by the CAA with input from members of the GA community, asked six main questions and was open for six weeks.

You said

We received a total of 400 responses of which 387 were unique. Where possible, the unique responses were categorised in order to identify and weight the responses accordingly. We have prepared a Comment Response document (CAP1927) that summarises the results.

We did

Following this consultation results analysis, we have been liaising internally within the CAA and CAP1927 sets out how this project will now be undertaken.

Overview

In this consultation document we propose extending paid-for initial pilot training to be conducted using amateur-built microlights which hold a UK national Permit to Fly (PtF).

We are proposing that this training can now be undertaken by those pilots who are not owners of the aircraft. Currently, to undertake initial training in PtF aeroplanes, the student would need to be an owner or part-owner for this to be acceptable.

Why we are consulting

The CAA believes this consultation represents a comprehensive yet proportionate set of requirements and, by implementing the safety mitigations proposed by the BMAA and the LAA provides a sound basis for maintaining appropriate safety standards of airworthiness as well as ensuring that training and testing for pilots is more accessible.

The change could have a positive impact on the flight training sector, including potential cost savings that could encourage greater student up-take.

Consultation document

The consultation document sets out:

  • The current regulations surrounding pilot training
  • The difference between Type Approved (factory-built) and Type Accepted (amateur-built) microlights
  • The potential benefits and risks of this proposal
  • A comparision of  occurrence data comparing Type Approved (factory-built) and Type Accepted (amateur-built) microlights. It is recognised that a general conclusion from this data may not be representative due to the small sample size available, And
  • The safety mitigations proposed by the British Microlight Aircraft Association (BMAA) and Light Aircraft Association (LAA) to provide a comparable level of safety.

Consultation questions are included in appendix A.

Download: Consultation: Conducting paid-for initial pilot training in amateur-built UK National Permit to Fly Microlights

Audiences

  • General Aviation

Interests

  • Light aircraft
  • Microlights
  • Training